Tallest Climate Tale Winner

Thanks to GWPF for honoring my submission nominating the Tallest Climate Tale of 2019. Their post is We Have A Winner: Tallest Climate Tale of 2019 Text below in italics.Date: 12/02/20GWPF

We have been deliberating hard, and have decided upon a winner for our competition.

At the start of the year, we asked GWPF readers to send us nominations for our search to find the tallest climate tale of 2019. You have not let us down, sending us in entries from around the world.

An honourable mention must go to last year’s winner, Andrew Kissling, from New Zealand, who delivered the goods yet again. Amongst his excellent entries were an article claiming child marriage was increasing because of climate change, and that chips are now an inch shorter, and climate change is to blame.

However, topping the list this year was Ron Clutz, who many of you may be familiar with from his blog, Science Matters. The judges felt that his entry captured perfectly the absurdity of today’s climate change debate.

The article claimed that rational thought itself may become a victim of climate change. We at the GWPF know that rational discussion about climate change is already very rare.

Congratulations to Ron, who wins a bottle of whisky and two GWPF books (Population Bombed and The Polar Bear Catastrophe that Never Happened).

Original Post:  CO2 Hysteria Impairs Thinking

An article by James Pero at Daily Mail confirms suspicions about muddled thinking regarding global warming/climate change.  Is carbon dioxide making it harder to THINK straight?   Excerpts in italics with my comments and images.

Rising CO2 levels may hinder cognitive function and could decrease decision-making efficiency by 50 PERCENT in 2100, study says. 

  • Carbon emissions may have a drastic impact on cognitive function
  • Researchers say that CO2 may decrease classroom decision making
  • It could reduce decision making by as much as 50 percent in 2100, they say

Rational thought may eventually become a victim of climate change according to a new study.

[Well, media announcements and studies like this one show rationality is already greatly compromised.]

Research presented by scientists at the annual American Geophysical Union and submitted to the journal GeoHealth suggests that increased CO2 may soon diminish humans’ capacity to think clearly.

The findings follow previous studies that show how indoor air pollution and poor ventilation can hinder people’s ability to perform mentally, including a study published last year from the University College London.

[Note the chart at the top showing that CO2 in the atmosphere is 410ppm (parts/per/million), or 0.04%.  Note also that health and safety regulations for buildings expect no harmful effects below 5000 ppm, which would be 10 times the present amount.]

‘Human cognitive performance declines with an increase in CO2’, the researchers wrote in the paper.

‘Direct impacts of CO2 emissions on human cognitive performance may be unavoidable.’

Those studies concluded that circulating air and regulating the amount of CO2 trapped in a room can help mitigate the effects of too much CO2, but new research suggests ventilation in a climate change-addled future might just make matters worse.

[This diagram shows the ratio of human to natural carbon dioxide in the atmosphere equals the ratio of their inflows, independent of residence time.

The amount of CO2 flowing from humans into the atmosphere is miniscule (about 4%) compared to CO2 flowing from the oceans and biosphere (96%).  Thus the human component presently is 17ppm (or 0.002%).  Eliminating our emissions entirely would have no discernable impact on the total amount.  See Who to Blame for Rising CO2?]

It also used two different climate models – one that factors in reductions in CO2 and another that projects conditions if emissions continue unfettered.

In the model that factors in some emissions intervention, scientists say decision making in the classroom could decrease by 25 percent while a model without emissions mitigation could see a whopping 50 percent reduction.

Though previous studies have shown a correlation between brain function and CO2, not much is currently understood about why the gas affects our brains the way it does.

As noted by Gizmodo, a previous study on CO2’s correlation to brain function showed that an increase as little as 5 percent had reduces brain activity.

[Let’s see: A 5% increase in CO2 would be a leap from 0.041% to 0.043%, requiring some fine sensors to even detect it.  Doubtful that brains are that sensitive to the gas itself, but obviously there is huge sensitivity to the idea of rising CO2.

OTOH plants have sensed and appreciated the increased CO2 as shown in the greening of the planet since 1982]
No current research has studied the kind of long-term exposure that will would result from rampant climate change.

As noted by researchers, however, all of the adverse effects of CO2 on mental performance can still be averted by making a concerted effort to lower emissions and stave off climate change.

This is your brain on CO2 hysteria. Just say no!

 

8 comments

  1. Genghis · February 13

    Ron,
    At the beginning of the Cambrian (life vs Pre-life) but we know that life beneath the waves occurred thousands of year before this. But this was when plants first were recognized on land. Now around this time CO2 was around 6-7,000 ppm. It is very likely that CO2 was responsible for the migration of sea plants to earth plants with animals following afterwards. The jump was because more nutritious CO2 was in the air not in the water
    Regards,

    Like

    • Ron Clutz · February 13

      Thanks, Genghis. That explains why most plants prefer higher CO2 concentrations than today.

      Like

  2. ArndB · February 13

    Congratulations and continue to succeed

    Like

  3. Raymond · February 14

    Hey Ron

    CONGRATULATIONS ON WIN FIRST PRIZE

    The reason why I’m so interested in putting back some common sense into the topic is exactly as you put it, rationally seems to have become hijacked by the climate change hype.

    My parents joined a fundamentalist religion in the late 60s. This organization propagated the end of the world in just a few years. That they would be the chosen ones with a special place in the new promised land. My parent believed and lived in a bubble of ignorance and were robbed of their money. To top it all off you could never live up to the expectations and you were always guilty of something. The list is so long that nobody in his right mind would go along with this. But guilt is so powerful. There are so many parallels will the Climate Movement. The movement is dogmatic, fundamentalist and uses fear-mongering to achieve its goals. Regardless of all the facts you can present, they simply don’t care or ignore them. The wall is impenetrable at the moment, and one has the impression that it is seeping into the everyday lives of so many people. They just don’t notice it. Most people are so busy keeping their heads above water that their common sense is turned off. The daily dose of guilt that is broadcast on all channels leads people to really think that humanity is the evil of our planet. I see these symptoms because of my past experiences. It is sometimes very difficult to communicate the dangers because most people simply cannot imagine how they are being manipulated. It will be a hard fight.

    Like

  4. Raymond · February 14

    It’s supposed to be WINNING and not WIN … sorry.
    CONGRATULATIONS ON WINING FIRST PRIZE

    (Chernobyl)
    If we hear enough lies long enough, we will no longer be able to recognize the truth.

    Like

  5. Hifast · February 15

    Reblogged this on Climate Collections.

    Like

  6. rw · February 20

    Have you passed the word along to the Daily Mail? Let them wonder whether they’re sharing the limelight or acting as one of your foils.

    Like

    • Ron Clutz · February 21

      I am 97% certain they will trot the story out again this year, so we can have another go at them. It’s all a game of Whack-a-Mole, don’t you know.

      Like

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